With more than five million rifles produced and billions of rounds fired over nearly five decades, the Remington Model 700 rifle has undoubtedly been the preferred choice for millions of hunters, shooting enthusiasts, military and law enforcement personnel.

It has also been the focus of a CNBC 10-month investigation that originally aired in 2010 under the title “RemingtonUnder Fire”.

This investigation turned up thousands of complaints, two dozen deaths, more than 100 injuries and 75-plus lawsuits, all alleging the gun fired without the trigger being pulled.

In response, Remington Arms released an official statement, stating that if the “Ten Commandments of Firearm Safety” were followed, accidents would not occur.  This list can be found here:

  • Always keep the muzzle pointed in a safe direction.
  • Firearms should be unloaded when not actually in use.
  • Don’t rely on your gun’s safety.
  • Be sure of your target and what’s beyond it.
  • Use proper ammunition.
  • If your gun fails to fire when the trigger is pulled, handle with care.
  • Always wear eye and ear protection when shooting.
  • Be sure the barrel is clear of obstructions before shooting.
  • Don’t alter or modify your gun and have it serviced regularly.
  • Learn the mechanical and handling characteristics of the firearm you are using.
  • Always keep the muzzle pointed in a safe direction.Firearms should be unloaded when not actually in use.Don’t rely on your gun’s safety.Be sure of your target and what’s beyond it.Use proper ammunition.If your gun fails to fire when the trigger is pulled, handle with care.Always wear eye and ear protection when shooting.Be sure the barrel is clear of obstructions before shooting.Don’t alter or modify your gun and have it serviced regularly.Learn the mechanical and handling characteristics of the firearm you are using.

    This updated list of commandments, which had been used by shooting professionals for decades prior, was rewritten by the public relations firm Hill & Knowlton…

    Should Remington have addressed the defect and issued a recall? Or, was their decision to hire a PR firm and stick to the prevalent usage of the weapon the right thing for a firearm manufacturer to do?

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